focus focus

 

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just-shower-thoughts:

 

The moral of the Tortoise and the Hare shouldn’t be “slow and steady wins the race.” The Tortoise only won because the Hare kept getting distracted. The moral should instead be “stay on task.”

 

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So.

 

Staying on task in business.

 

Staying on task has different dimensions. The most basic are <a> staying on task throughout and <b> being focused in the moments that matter in the task.

 

pause thin focusThe second isn’t as easy as you may think.

 

You have to be on task in the first place and then you actually have to recognize the moment that matters. In sports this is easier because sports has a tendency to ‘present’ the moment that matter but in business these moments tend to be a little more sneaky.

 

Regardless.

 

Moments that matter are truly the moments in which it doesn’t matter whether you are a tortoise or a hare. In these types of moments all becomes one, judged equally, and … well … times stands still and you either produce or you don’t.

 

Everything that came before and all that comes after is kind of irrelevant.

 

Everything gets squeezed into what you do in that moment.

 

And this is where the flair for the dramatic can occur.

Well.

It seems dramatic only because <a> doing the dramatic is special (not everyone can do it> and <b> ‘having a flair’ implies the person can deliver ‘the goods’ in the moment more than once and possibly on a relatively consistent basis.

 

Suffice it to say … anyone who has a flair for the dramatic deserves not only some accolades but also some analysis.

 

On the analysis front I would argue that this person has a key attribute with two seeking an insight my head thnk focus claritydimensions  – a unique type of focus which <a> has the ability to recognize the massive amount of self-imposed distractions which inevitably slows other people down … and shuts them out and <b> has the ability to ‘slow things down.’

 

I think this focus permits a person to ignore all the expectations placed upon their decision <but accept that they are there>, and ignore the inherent pressure to live up to the monumental things that people around the person expect him/her to do … and constantly lives up to them.

 

By the way.

 

If you can also do this with some class, dignity, integrity and humility … well … you will earn gobs of money.

 

I would suggest that this person embodies this formula:

 

 

Expertise = secure = confidence.

 

 

Winning in these business moments is often more about confidence, and how the attitude enables clear ‘non-hedging’ articulation of what can be done, than anything else. And that confidence embraces real expertise brought to the fore by that unique focus I described.

 

All that said.

 

Here is why I really like these people.

 

I abhor social chameleons: people who change to impress whoever they happen to be with.

99% of the time chameleons suck in the moments that matter.

 

If I were a betting man, I would bet that anyone you may know with a flair for the dramatic is not a chameleon.

 

calm down focusAt the core of almost any person with the flair for the dramatic is someone who knows who they are and knows who they ain’t … and stays true to that day in and day out.

 

That ‘trueness’ permits this person to offer a steady consistency on the ‘ask at hand’ which is not about maintaining one speed but rather maintaining a consistent sense for how to adjust pacing accordingly.

And what THAT means is that this person is also more likely to spot the moment that matters and zero in with their unique focus in that moment.

 

I cannot tell you how important, and how valuable, this is. I say that because I sometimes think while we admire the people with the flair for the dramatic we diminish the abilities that actually permit it to happen.

 

Why do I say that?

 

Business systems, more often than not, are a bit more complicated in their underlying dynamics than simplistic theory or simplistic diagrams attempting to create structure to an organization and its dynamics with the market & consumers/buyers.

 

I would draw a picture to show you this but I would suggest that you cannot draw a picture for what is <because it is obsolete as soon as it is drawn> and you cannot draw a picture for what will be <because predicting multi-dimensional dynamics is outside the purview of reality>.

complex person rubix cube ichi nichi

Therefore, in business, moments that matter are most likely found within a spinning Rubik cube and the ones who have the fair for the dramatic have the ability to actually step in, at exactly the right moment, and in that moment solve the Rubik cube.

 

Seeing as I, personally, have never solves a Rubik cube … this sounds particularly complicated and sounds like it would take an incredible skill in order to do.

 

That is what someone in business with a flair for the dramatic does.

 

All that said.

 

This skill is a version of slowing down to speed up.

 

And you cannot pay enough money to a business person who has the ability to know when to slow down to enable effective speeding up … or to pause to accept some responsibility <or explain> … or to fast forward at the right time.

 

That is why you cannot pay enough money to a business person who has the impatience rubixability to stand still without really standing still.

What I mean by that is this is the business person who can seemingly pause in the midst of play <on multiple dimensions> and grab the Rubik cube and solves it.

 

I don’t care if you call this a flair for the dramatic.

I don’t care if you call it ‘slowing down to speed up.’

I don’t care if you call this “an ability to slow things down mentally.”

 

All I know is you should call it a person who you want in your business.

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Written by Bruce