Enlightened Conflict

everyday sort of magic

August 26th, 2014

magic make

 

 

——–

“I do believe in an every day sort of magic — the inexplicable connectedness we sometimes experience with places, people, works of art and the like; the eerie appropriateness of moments of synchronicity; the whispered voice, the hidden presence, when we think we’re alone.”

=

Charles de Lint

——–

 

 

Well.

 

 

 

I guess in some way I must be an impractical non-pragmatic dreamer type <despite anything I may have said about myself I the past> because I loved this quote as soon as I saw it.

 

 

 

I do believe in an everyday sort of magic.

 

 

I do believe that despite the everyday Life grind we encounter a little magic in our lives … every day.

 

 

 

I do believe more of us should see this … or maybe take a moment and recognize this.

 

 

 

I do believe we ignore the eerie appropriateness of moments of synchronicity too easily <and too often>.

 

 

I do believe we need to embrace hope just a little bit more often <on more days>.

 

 

moment insightI do believe magic can be found in stars and rainbows <which we should take a moment and enjoy more often>.

 

 

But.

 

 

 

In the end … I tend to believe we should seek some magic, more often, in simple seemingly meaningless moments and silent random encounters with people.

 

 

I do believe that no matter how alone, or lonely, you may feel there is always someone somewhere who, while may not be thinking about you at that moment, is willing and wants to think about you <and isn’t all that matters?>.

 

 

Does this make me some sort of dreamer?

 

 

Heck.

 

moment beautiful

I don’t know.

 

 

All I know is that I am someone who believes in everyday sort of magic.

 

visible and invisible

April 18th, 2014

invisible but visible

So.

 

This is about the trick of being present and absent at the same time.

 

What made me think of this?

 

When I read this in a book …

 

 

“… marveled at the way in which three clear liquids … nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and water … when combined produce color … and not just any color … but the color of a flaming sunset.”

 

Well.

 

That made me think about business and the ability to slip behind the scenes and take some invisible things … and … well … make them visible.

And visible in a delightful colorful way.

 

Ok.

 

Let’s say these are the people who take things most of us just cannot, or do not, see … and make them visible in a meaningful way that is relevant and recognized.

 

Anyway … the mixture I described above is sometimes called Aqua regia (Latin and Ancient Italian, lit. “royal water”) or aqua regis (Latin, lit. “king’s water”).

 

 

Regardless.

 

We know these people in business.

Hmmmmmmmmmm … well … maybe not.

 

Because these people who seem to be able to take the invisible things and put them together in ways that make them visible … also tend to be exactly the same way.

 

They tend to be silent … or maybe quieter … and certainly barely visible <unless you are paying attention>.

 

 

And in today’s world silent smarts is not exactly the way to the top of the heap.

 

Which is unfortunate … because these invisible characters, who are often not seen or often heard, but who can often have a visible effect on events … are invaluable.

 

Sometimes unseen … but invaluable.

 

Unseen because they are really good at remaining still … and silent … and have mastered nonchalant intent listening … but their eyes , while saying nothing, never remain still.

 

Interestingly … just like the formula I mentioned above <royal or king’s water> … they tend to become visible when mixed with the right partner or on the right team. They ‘mix’ in a way that makes their ‘clear’ have ‘color.’

 

But I am writing more about those invisible clear aspects in business that remain unseen by the majority of business people. Those invisible, or only slightly visible, aspects all businesses have. The ones most of us miss … because as most of us rush from one place to another, one meeting after another, one crisis after another … our ‘thoughtful moments’ are mostly ‘visionary’ … or ‘horizon’ viewing moments … because we are told that is how to make it to the top of the heap.

 

You need to think big.

 

invisible presenceYou need a big idea.

 

You need to see the bigger vision.

 

And all those things are good. and necessary.

But it is quite possible we are forgetting HOW to do it.

 

 

Why?

Well.

 

In todays business world if we don’t believe something exists … well … then it doesn’t. What is invisible cannot become visible because .. well … if ts not visible it doesn’t exist.

 

But truth is that if we don’t know that something exists … it really doesn’t mean that it doesn’t.

It only means we don’t know one way or the other or maybe we just haven’t been made aware of it yet.

 

Someone wrote somewhere that evidence is not about proof or certainty or necessity but rather it is simply something that can contribute to belief.

This means we can have evidence but it is in no way conclusive.

 

 

This is the fundamental mistake when discussing evidence. The mistake in the belief or assumption that there can only be evidence for claims that are true.

 

But there is in fact a vast amount of evidence for claims that are in fact false.

 

The context here has to do with lack of awareness.

 

When people dismiss that possibility simply because they weren’t aware of it, or haven’t made the attempt to explore it, or haven’t looked beyond their own personal usage/viewpoint — then they are all too frequently jumping to conclusions based on … well … lack of information rather than the presence of it.

 

The people who do not fall into this trap? The ones who can see the invisible things. The ones who can actually take clear components and put them together and create something tangible and colorful.

 

 

Regardless.

 

The ability to be present … but invisible … is a knack.

 

The ability to take what is present but invisible and combine them to make them not only visible .. but colorful is also a knack.

 

I am not sure they are trainable … I could be wrong … but I tend to believe they are more a knack, an innate ability, more than one that can be taught.

 

 

 

I do know that the people who talk the most don’t always have the most to say.invisible and visible silent listen

I also know <okay … believe> that most of these people with this innate ability to find invisible things are really good listeners.

 

They listen to what is not being said.

They see what is unseen.

They find the thread of the true message in the sounds around them.

 

 

They find invisible things … maybe even unclear undeveloped ideas … and these things become visible in their heads.

 

Oh.

And they tend to use silence like a weapon.

 

While others seem to embrace some desire to speak and showcase knowledge or what an individual can do … they remain silent.

They also sometimes have the ability to become attuned to the magic that can occur when all the others blend their ideas and abilities. And then they only act, become visible, if it is needed to strengthen that which is.

 

That last thought?

Well.

 

This is all really tricky if you want to become a leader.

 

We think of leaders as needing to stand out or even apart from the rest of the team.

invisible visible nothingnessYet the most influential leaders also know how to blend the invisible factor with the visible factor.

 

They know there is an appropriate time for standing out and apart from the group.

 

But in today’s business world potential leaders <and even some already in leadership positions> have a fear that blending in <remaining invisible even though present … and making an impact> will cause their value to diminish.

And it does <not in my eyes but in the business world as it exists today>.

 

While the ability to bring out the best in others without visibly doing anything is a true leadership skill … and the sign of a true leader … invisibility leads to often becoming, perception wise, superfluous.

 

I say that because being invisible but present, blending in and standing out, is an art.

 

And I say that because having the ability to combine invisible factors and creating something wonderful and visible … is a skill.

 

Anyway.

 

Think of it this way.writing colors

If you know someone at your company or in business who makes you ‘marvel at the way in which they are able to take three clear liquids and combine them to produce color … and not just any color … but the color of a flaming sunset’ you should pay them gobs of money or just make sure that you pay attention to them.

 

Because invisible is … well … invisible to pretty much everyone.

And anyone who can see the invisible is worth every penny you can pay them.

 

Because the most colorful beautiful visible in business … is inevitably created from some random combination of ‘less than visible’ aspects.

my story my house my fire

April 8th, 2014

 

story house hustle

“A story is not like a road to follow … it’s more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you.” —Alice Munro

 

Whew.

 

My house is my story.

What a great thought.

 

 

Oh.

 

And it is always on fire.

 

“We all live in a house on fire – no fire department to call, no way out. Just the upstairs window to look out of while the fire burns the fire better personhouse down with us trapped in it.” – Tennessee Williams

 

Well.

 

If my story is my house … well … I tend to believe we all live in a house on fire.

And for years I have debated what the Williams quote really meant … at least to me … and then I found the ‘house is my story’ quote and I had my answer.

 

Now … I am no literary expert nor am I particularly insightful with regard to inner meanings … therefore my thoughts are tainted <or skewed> by my attitude toward Life and living.

 

That said.

Me? We don’t need no water … let the motherfucker burn.

 

Oops.

My attitude … my thoughts.

 

Well … I actually think a couple thoughts.  Inner fire. Outer fire. Our story is surrounded by fire.

Within and without.

 

 

The inner fire.

 

The fire is inner curiosity.  A passion for something. A spirit and capacity for something … it doesn’t have to be something big … just something.

And it is always burning … and it can burn you up if you don’t set it free.

It is a restless fire.

 

I will make a generalization here … but … suffice it to say that we all know bitter people. People who have strong opinions but are fairly close minded.

 

They are burning up from the inside out.

In the close mindedness they have squeezed the fire of life so tightly it fries them. The rooms in the house are burning and they have no place to go.

 

 

That’s why I rarely get angry with close minded people or bitter people … I know that most of them are simply burning up from an inner fire that curiosity just hasn’t set free.

 

By the way … this also means that I don’t really believe the inner spark goes out in most people.

 

Why?.

 

The people that have lost that inner fire have simply lost hope … and maybe I am naïve but I hope that they are few and far between.

 

Do not let your fire go out, sparked by irreplaceable spark. And the hopeless swamps of the not quite, the not yet, and the not at all. Do fire hands flamesnot let the hero in your soul perish.

And lonely frustration for the life you deserved but never been able to reach.

The world you desire can be won. It exists.

It is real. It is possible.

And it is yours.”

=

Lucas Scott on One Tree Hill

 

I think the inner spark always burns.

That there is a fire within everyone.

 

Uhm.

Yeah.

 

Everyone.

 

That inner fire is burning all the time … some people get burned up … others spread the fire … but that fire is there … awaiting to be rekindled if it is diminished.

 —

“In everyone’s life, at some time, our inner fire goes out.

It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being. We should all be thankful for those people who rekindle the inner spirit.”

=

Albert Schweitzer

 

Ok.

 

Then there is the outer fire.

 

This would be the house we live in … burning down around us.

 

I believe the house we live in, Life, burns all the time.

Because our story lives within a forest always burning.

 

 

Life isn’t easy.

People live.

People die.

 

And in-between the fire always burns.

 

 

Here is the challenge with your story being your house and the thought it is always burning.

 

Sometimes in the comfort, the safety, of our home … our story feels safe …  and we don’t even feel we are getting burned.

 

fire walk thruThis is dangerous … because in the end we kind of helplessly watch the fire slowly consume us.

I use safe and comfort and suggest stagnancy … or standing still within the walls of what you know as an example of how you can be consumed by the fire.

 

Well.

 

Because comfortable complacency does not mean you are not safe.

 

Why?

Well. The house is burning for gods sake.

 

The fact is that this fire never goes out.

 

We can never stamp out this fire.

 

It rages off and on but is always burning.

 

Safety within the home of what you know is temporary.

 

Inevitably the fire will consume you by squeezing out what make life interesting and worthwhile. As a counterpoint to inner fire … it suffocates the fire within with the fire coming from without.

 

Your story burns.

 

Your story ends up being a burned out shell with everything within extinguished. Just ashes where a raging story once stood.

 

Anyway.

 

I admit.

I like the thought of my story being my house … and that it is always on fire.

 

And while I am not a woman … the point of this quote resonates with me:

 

She lives her life like a flame; a dance of purposeful chaos … her enchanting light can guide you and quell your fears … she’s hot; inner fire hughwarming those who respect her and burning those who don’t.

She is a flame with an unforgettable glow.

A weak man will try to dim her luminance… but her soul mate will take pleasure in fanning the blaze.

=

Steve Maraboli

A flame with an unforgettable glow.

 

Whew. What a story that would be.

 

Therefore.

Let it rage <I say>.

 

 

Story.

House.

Fire.

 

It is a life truth that we make choices that resonate throughout our lives … but how your story is told … and maybe how it dies … may be the biggest truth.

 

Aw.

 

That’s too deep for today.

 

Geez … all I am fairly sure of is that the Life is burning around us.

 

And what about your house?

 

Well.

It may not be burning.

 

 

And me?

 

I think of words from Julianna Hatfield:

“I wrote and wrote like the house was on fire, like words and chords and melodies were going to burn up and disintegrate into the air if didn’t capture them fast enough.”

=

Juliana Hatfield

 —

I love that thought.

 

I will write my story like the house was on fire.

 

I will think thoughts before they disintegrate into ash.

 

I will live life like the house is burning around me.

 

fire the world is yoursAnd hope I have a fire never quenched.

 

“Some men, like a tiled house, are long before they take fire, but once on flame there is no coming near to quench them.”

Thomas Fuller

 

Because if our Life is constantly on fire … whew … what a view we have from that upstairs window as it all burns.

 

My story.

My house.

My fire.

 

“The roof, the roof, the roof is on fire. We don’t need no water, let the motherf–ker burn.”

<”Tear the Roof off the Sucker” – chant often blended with ‘The Roof Is on Fire’ by Rockmaster Scott & The Dynamic Three>story on hand

 

My story. My house.

 

Let the motherfucker burn.

 

Now there’s an attitude to live by.

 

What’s your story?

being dauntless

April 2nd, 2014

dauntless stand up

“We’ve all started to put down the virtues of the other factions in the process of bolstering our own. I don’t want to do that. I want to be brave, and selfless, and smart, and kind, and honest.” – Four <Divergent>

 

 

 

“Virtue refuses facility for her companion … the easy, gentle, and sloping path that guides the footsteps of a good natural disposition is not the path of true virtue. It demands a rough and thorny road.”  - Michel de Montaigne

 

So.

 

Being dauntless.

 

In an otherwise incredibly poorly written great story <the Divergent trilogy> we get to think about the value of … well … virtue.

 

The book places society into five different factions … each espousing one specific virtue <at the expense of other virtues>.

 

I imagine one of the points is that making one virtue your Life focus is bad in that we are a complex balance of a number of virtues.

 

Anyway.

 

The factions are <virtues>:dauntless divergent 5

 

Abnegation.

Amity.

Erudite.

Candor.

Dauntless.

 

 

It is in the Dauntless idea in which I found something that truly struck a chord.

 

Something I found valuable to think about.

 

Not just for me … but society and people in general.

Let me share some words in the Dauntless Manifesto:

 

 

“We believe in ordinary acts of bravery, in the courage that drives one person to stand up for another.”

 

 

Well.

 

There is a thought.

No.

There is a BIG thought.

 

Why do I think so?

 

In a me, me, me world <or at least it sometimes feels that way these days> … in a world where if I see never ending advice like ‘no one will stand up for you but yourself’ … or … ‘the only one you can count on is yourself’ one more time … I will … well … begin to lose a little faith in humanity … this thought is something we should all wrap our heads around.

 

In ordinary acts of bravery.

 

Bravery as in everyday actions and not in running into fires to save someone or stepping in front of a bullet.

 

Bravery as in stepping in front of criticism.

 

Bravery as in stepping in front of ‘doing nothing.’

 

Bravery as in stepping in and doing what is right <even if it may not be the easiest thing to do>.

 

Or.

 

How about these words:

 

“We believe in shouting for those who can only whisper, in defending those who cannot defend themselves.”

 

 

To be clear.

The thought is not that I am not suggesting shouting … but rather speaking out for those who only whisper.

And defending those who cannot defend themselves.

 

Look.

The world is made up of a bunch of different people.

It is crazy … fucking crazy … to criticize and diminish the people who only whisper … or do not always defend themselves. We may not like it … we may wish that they stood up and spoke out … but just because they don’t doesn’t make them ‘lesser than.’ It is simply what it is. Accept it. and if you can make a difference … and you want to make a difference … then make a difference. You are no better than the other person … you are simply doing what you do.

If you are dauntless … then be dauntless.

 

But I imagine my real point is … well … if you have this dauntless virtue than accept the responsibility.

It is who you are and you should be it.

 

My next point?

 

dauntless freedom sacrificeFearless and dauntless are two completely different things.

Dauntless doesn’t mean you do not have fear … it simply means ‘going the way despite maybe having fear.’

 

 

Dauntless is a relentless pursuit of what you believe is right.

 

As Montaigne suggests it is not an easy gentle slope of living life … it is a rough and thorny road.

 

But Montaigne <and I imagine Divergent suggested> understood that there is a Life worth fighting for.

Well.

At least there is a vision of what Life should be.

 

I found it interesting that the author of the Divergent trilogy suggested the following lyrics to this song captured the essence of what she was writing about <and I thought it also was relevant to being dauntless>:

 

 

“Hold on to the world we all remember fighting for

There’s some strength left in you yet

Hold on to the world we all remember dying for

There’s some hope left in it yet

Arise and be

All that you dreamed.

– Flyleaf <Arise>

 

 

Ah.

Arise and be all that you dreamed.

 

Do we not all dream about standing up for those who cannot stand on their own?

Do we not dream about speaking up for those who can only whisper?

Or defending those who cannot defend themselves?

 

Maybe that is dauntless.

And if that is being Dauntless … well … sign me up.

 

 

Now.

We may all dream of being ‘that person.’

But that is not for everyone. And it shouldn’t be. Because sometimes being dauntless means you are simply clearing the way … opening the pathway … so someone can get through and do what they do.dauntless one thing

 

And what they do is make the world a little more like the world we remember worth dying for.

 

Roles & responsibilities.

 

We all have roles & responsibilities in Life. We may seek or desire to be ‘more’ … but reality often suggests we have a specific role … and responsibility.

 

Embrace your role.

Embrace your responsibility.

 

And embrace being dauntless in doing so.

 

 

Regardless.

 

The Dauntless Manifesto has some thoughtful thoughts. Things we should all think about. Things that may remind us of the world we remember worth dying for.

 

And, what the hell, if I can channel Montaigne thru the Divergent trilogy there certainly has to be some meaning worthwhile to ponder.

 

 

 

Anyway.

 

Parts of the Dauntless Manifesto are silly … but it is a poorly written young adult book so just focus on the sometimes breathtaking choice of words:

dauntless manifesto

—————————–

Dauntless manifesto:

 

 

We believe that cowardice is to blame for the world’s injustices.

We believe that peace is hard-won, that sometimes it is necessary to fight for peace. But more than that: We believe that justice is more important than peace.

We believe in freedom from fear, in denying fear the power to influence our decisions. We believe in ordinary acts of bravery, in the courage that drives one person to stand up for another.

We believe in acknowledging fear and the extent to which it rules us. We believe in facing that fear no matter what the cost to our comfort, our happiness, or even our sanity.

We believe in shouting for those who can only whisper, in defending those who cannot defend themselves.

We believe, not just in bold words but in bold deeds to match them. We believe that pain and death are better than cowardice and inaction because we believe in action.

We do not believe in living comfortable lives. We do not believe that silence is useful.

We do not believe in good manners.

We do not believe in empty heads, empty mouths, or empty hands.

We do not believe that learning to master violence encourages unnecessary violence.

We do not believe that we should be allowed to stand idly by. We do not believe that any other virtue is more important than bravery.

 

——————————-

 

 

 

sounds

November 12th, 2013

 

“There is something in every one of you that waits and listens for the sound of the genuine in yourself. sound treesIt is the only true guide you will ever have.” – Howard Thurman

 

 

This is about sounds.

 

There are those sounds so awful … you cringe.

Oh.

And then those sounds which make you sit back and sigh.

 

Oddly … I may suggest the most wonderful sound in the world is the silence that follows the last note of your favorite song. Can silence really be a sound?

 

A good friend of mine told me the most beautiful sound in the world was the laughter of his children.

 

Well.

I don’t know why I thought of this but I started a list years ago of what I consider the sweetest sounds in the world. Now that I have filled up the little paper with scribbles of random thoughts … I figured it was time to share:

 

 

-          “and the dreams you dare to dream … really do come true.” I wanted to say Judy Garland singing ‘Over the Rainbow’ but I thought I would be more exacting … these specific lyrics. In the right mood ‘Over the Rainbow’ can bring a tear to my eye. In every mood those lyrics make me dream. What more could you ask of sound?

 

 

-          A baseball coming off a wood bat right in the sweet spot. Ah. That ‘crack.’ You don’t even have to look. You know it was hit on the nose <a fastball hitting a catcher’s mitt was a close second here>.

 

 

-          Church bells in the distance. It doesn’t matter if you are religious or not, believe in God or any higher being, church bells play to your soul and make an offering with their sound to whomever is watching over us.

 

 

leaves blowing-          The crunch of fall leaves under your feet. It has always confounded me that the sound of dead leaves can make the air crackle with life.

 

 

-          The little sniff your dog makes as he nuzzles you when he knows, somehow, that something is wrong. The little sound tells you he is there in case you need someone. It is the sound of someone loving you more than they love themselves … maybe even more than Life itself. I tend to think it is the sound of unbounded companionship.

<a close second was the raucous scrabble of paws when you open the front door after having been gone for 3 hours or 3 days … sometimes even 3 minutes>.

 

 

-          The drone of a propeller plane overhead. Have you ever noticed they seem to only be heard on days with blue skies and big puffy white clouds?

 

 

-          Horses’ hooves clattering on cobblestone. No matter where you are or what you are doing this sound will place you somewhere back in time. I am not sure there is another sound which sounds like history better than this one.

 

 

-          Violins. I could probably have chosen any instrument well played but the stirring sweeping sounds of a group of violins or the single mournful tug in your heart from a solo violin in a Beethoven <place any great composer here> symphony? Well. Close your eyes. Is there a sweeter sound?

 

 

 

-          “Yes” <possibly tied with with “everything will be alright”>. There are moments when you listen to someone say something … and then there are moments. You have shared your thoughts … maybe just a crazy idea … maybe your dreams … maybe something you have held inside for a very very long time. Nothing beats hearing you are right … or all will be okay.sound tea

 

 

 

-          Marvin Gaye. Possibly the smoothest singing voice you will ever hear. Roberta Flack sang “killing me softly with his song” for the first time as Marvin Gaye stood offstage. It wasn’t about him but should have been. He was able to transition seamlessly to impossibly high registers. In some songs his voice jumps up 2 octaves without the slightest of hesitation and when he sings in the lower register … he speaks to whatever inner voice you have.

 

 

-          The sound of rain gently falling on tree leaves … best in the morning just as you wake up. That light pitter patter on leaves just outside the window. Enough said.

 

 

-          Someone from eastern Europe speaking English. English is a tough language to grasp. An eastern European woman struggling to communicate in English … or even smoothly communicating in English … they inevitably have a throaty delivery that makes every man in the room tingle.

 

 

-          The soft quick crack of an ice cube placed in an already cold drink. You want something cool to drink. The crack is confirmation that you now have a cold drink. Even cooler.

 

 

 

reading cracking open a book-          The pages of an old book rustling like an old parchment as you turn the pages. Its not just the rough feeling of that thicker paper less pliable because of time upon your fingers … it is the sound that the pages make as you flip one over to read the dated type font and the words leap off the page with the sound of the rustling. Reading is never better.

 

 

 

-          Toni Braxton or Anita Baker singing almost anything. Their deeper voices sink into the pit of your stomach so far it aches. In fact … that is what touching your soul feels like.

 

 

-          The swishy sound of a woman walking in a full length skirt. There is a regalness that can be found in any and every woman. A sense of elegance. The swishing sound of a skirt as they slip into a room or step down the street is … well … the sound of elegance. You do not even have to look <although every red blooded man will>. This is the sound of a woman.

 

 

-          The opening notes of your favorite song. You don’t need more than 5 seconds and you know exactly what the song is. More importantly? With the sound … within those 5 finite seconds … you enter an infinite space of memories, feelings, thoughts.  This sound expands time. Some would call this sound a miracle.

 

 

-          The cable car bells in san Francisco. In any other place and time the clanging of the cable car bells would most likely be obnoxious. In the crooked streets of san Francisco, which sweep to impossible heights and depths, the echoes of the cable car bells are the birds of the city.

 

 

-          James Earl Jones’ voice. From Roots to Lion King to Darth Vader … he could describe your death to you and you would sit enraptured to the final word.

 

 

-          The inner voice we all have. Unfortunately it doesn’t sound like James sounds nice listEarl Jones <which would possibly make it easier to pay attention to and believe> but you hear it loud and clear on occasion. It is the sound of the ‘genuine’ within you. it is truly the only true guide you have. I wish it would speak more often but I always try and listen closely for its whisper.

 

 

And, of course …

 

-          “I love you” from someone you love.

 

be not an echo

September 28th, 2013

 

infinte be a voice not an echo

from Infinite on weheartit

Ah.

 

“Be a voice … not an echo. “

 

I love this thought.

 

A contributor named ‘Infinite’ … a tween from Spain I think … posted this on weheartit.com.

 

And then I found that it is a name for a blog <for the independent fashion bloggers of all people>.

 

They say this <which I am using because … well … I am pretty sure I couldn’t say it any better>:

 

Another way to think about it, are you voicing something original, or are you just echoing what you find to be the most popular? Granted nothing is truly original, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have your original angle on a particular story or niche. It doesn’t mean you can’t make the connection between two things that have never been connected. It doesn’t mean you can’t point out what others have overlooked.

Just because there is a formula out there for success, doesn’t mean you need to echo it to achieve your own success. Be your own voice, let others echo you.

 

Well.

 

“… be your own voice and let others echo you.”

 

That, my friends, is a nice thought.

 

Speak your own mind using your own knowledge and experience and what you think … and not just mindlessly repeat what you’ve heard … is not really that difficult.

Yet.

We seem to make it difficult.

We seem to do a lot of ‘echoing’ these days.

 

We seem to maybe not think as often as we could … or maybe should.

 

Look.

I am not suggesting everyone needs to be a leader … or even a thought leader … all the time. Echoing smart thinking and thoughts is … well … smart.

 

The difficult part <I imagine> is discerning the smart from the not-so-smart.

 

But that isn’t what this thought is about.

 

It is simply about speaking your mind.

Thinking before you speak.

Saying what you think.

And that it is okay to follow <choicefully and smartly> when appropriate … but you still should lend your voice and thoughts when you have an idea.

 

I am not going to suggest such trite or vapid thoughts as ‘be an originator, not an imitator’ but I will remind everyone that being yourself <which includes your own thoughts> is a good thing.  If you follow … just make sure you are echoing what you think and want to stand for. If not? Speak up. Lead the conversation. Spark some thinking.

think versus sayOh.

Yeah.

Spark some thinking.

 

I imagine another point I could end on is … a tween … independent fashion bloggers.

Think about that for a minute or two.

 

I admit … I like that I just listened to, thought about … and actually wrote citing … two sources that on the face of it would seem highly unlikely to have inspired such thinking.

 

What do I mean?

 

All voices matter.

 

Anyone can think.

 

Anyone can be smart.

 

And it is okay for an old semi-experienced guy who has seen a lot of shit in his life <that’s me by the way> … to echo the thoughts of a tween or some fashion bloggers.

 

We could all take that thought to heart.

silence speak

August 22nd, 2013

 

“… you make yourself void. You become silence. You become more silent than the silence around you. And then something silent majority shhhhextraordinary happens: you hear silence speak.”― Edmond Jabès

 

Listening.

 

Listening is hard.

 

Don’t let anyone try and convince you otherwise.

 

It takes a certain internal fortitude to be a great listener. It takes character to be silent as things you may not agree with swirl around you nipping at your own opinions and thoughts.

It is very very difficult to listen without bias or to listen without already formulating your own next words.

 

“Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” – Stephen Covey <the guy who wrote The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People>

 

Good listeners don’t pounce on individual words nor do they slice into your sentences talking you’re your next words and thoughts. They let you actually finish.  They permit the thought to get out not to be lost or altered in its formulation from your lips.

They allow you to keep going … even after you have finished. And sometimes they sneak in a question to remind you that you are actually not finished.

 

They allow silence to speak.

 

They permit words that are lost to be found.

 

And in finding these hidden words sometimes they find new thoughts of their own. They can see the world through someone else’s eyes … and see things a little differently.

If you let them … that is what words do.

Words help you see things … differently … more clearly … with colors or in stark black and white.

 

Maybe that is why you should listen … you become a discoverer.

An explorer.

Instead of presenting to people what you have already found … you revel in the discovery of something uncovered from another.

Ah.

Such little words ‘to’ and ‘from’ are … and yet … with regard to listening … they can make a world of difference.

 

Anyway.

Let me end with his fabulous thought on why we should all listen:

 

“So many words get lost. They leave the mouth and lose their courage, wandering aimlessly until they are swept into the gutter like dead leaves. On rainy days, you can hear their chorus rushing past: IwasabeautifulgirlPleasedon’tgoItoobelievemybodyismadeofglass-I’veneverlovedanyoneIthinkofmyselfasfunnyForgiveme….” – Nicole Krauss

 

What a wonderful thought in there … a great listener gives words their courage. I struggle to find a greater compliment in the world.

 

Anyway.

In general I believe we are becoming worse at listening … in business <for sure> and Life <somewhat>.

 

In business we seem to be teaching rushing from one thing to another like organized chickens with our proverbial heads cut off. That translates into less real listening and a focus on ‘effective communication’ <which kind of implies ‘listen to me’>. what kind of future leaders do we believe we are developing if we are not teaching them the value of being a good listener.

 

And in Life? Well. I don’t know that we are actually worse. I am just not sure we are actually taking the time to do it. As we rush from one thing on our to-do list to another it is <without any judgment> difficult to be a great listener. Therefore … not only is great listening difficult … the environment is not conducive to being a listener.

 

I know we can fix the business issue if we want to. We just have to want to.

Life?

Well.

We just have to do the best we can … try a little harder. Listen a little more … and a little more closely.

 

Let silence speak every once in a while.

famous last words

July 7th, 2013

“I am a continent that one day will sink without a sound into the sea.” – Gertrud Kolmar

 

So.famous last words rage-against-the-dying

This is about the last words you get to say in Life … or whether you sink without a sound.

I decided to write this because when writing my ‘no darkness only light’ thoughts and I had done some research on ‘light quotes’ and was tempted to use Goethe’s final words “more light.”

Oops. Or his ‘supposed last words’ I actually discovered <I will get to this later>.

 

Well.

 

I don’t think about death or dying a whole bunch but being a words guy I hope when the time comes I say something maybe useful … maybe memorable … maybe not stupid <setting a low bar>.

And as I researched ‘light quotes’ I came across this fabulous article on famous people and famous last words.

Oh. And be prepared … for not all last words are as good <and smart> as Voltaire’s:

 

“Now, now, my good man, this is no time for making enemies.“ Voltaire when asked by a priest to renounce Satan.

 

In fact … he was the exception to the rule.

My research has given me hope that under the spotlight of death I may not have to give my greatest performance … for others <greater than I in the gift of speaking> has failed in that spotlight.

 

Or maybe I should just take solace in Marx’s thought on last words … “Go on, get out! Last words are for fools who haven’t said enough!

 

Famous last words.

This is a reprint of a fabulous Christopher Orlet article:

 

From Marie Antoinette to Dylan Thomas, death be not eloquent

 

famous last-wordsWith few exceptions, the last words of history’s great players have been about as interesting and uplifting as a phone book. We may expect pearls of profundity from our expiring artists, philosophers, and world leaders, but more often we are left with dry-as-dust clichés.

 

Admittedly, it’s not exactly fair to expect deep insights into life’s mysteries when the dying clearly has other things on their minds—hell, for instance, or unspeakable pain. Bullet-riddled Francisco “Pancho” Villa was probably preoccupied when he told a comrade, “Don’t let it end this way. Tell them I said something.” But don’t we have the right to expect eloquence in the final stanzas of legendary wordsmiths like Lord Byron and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe? Byron couldn’t be bothered to work up a decent rhyme: “Now I shall go to sleep. Good night.” Goethe’s last words were so dull biographers have been obliged to edit creatively: “Open the second shutter so that more light may come in” became the more sublime “More light!” (There is, by the way, some debate whether Goethe’s last words were not, in fact, “Come my little one, and give me your paw.”)

 

And one is loath to mention Walt Whitman’s last barbaric yawp: “Hold me up; I want to shit.” Legendary wag Oscar Wilde’s last words were nothing more than shop talk. Commenting on a novel he had recently read, Wilde said, “This is a fine study of the American politician and possesses the quality of truth in characterization. What else has the lady written?”

 

Queens have left little more for the living to chew on. Elizabeth I was whiny (“All my possessions for a moment of time”), while Marie Antoinette was clumsy but polite: “Pardonnez-moi, Monsieur,” she said, after treading upon her executioner’s toe.

 

Ironically, it may have been the relatively obscure who delivered history’s best exit lines. Has anyone departed the scene better than minor English playwright Henry Arthur Jones, who, asked whom he would prefer to sit with him during the evening, his nurse or his niece, replied, “The prettier. Now fight for it.” Actor Edmund Gwenn was terse: “Dying is easy. Comedy is difficult.” And you have to admire the singleness of purpose in the last words of French grammarian Dominique Bouhours: “I am about to—or I am going to—die; either expression is used.”

 

For sheer entertainment value, you can’t beat the last words of condemned prisoners, particularly if you have a fondness for graveyard humor. Asked by the firing squad commander if he had a last request, James Roges said, “Why yes. A bulletproof vest!” And you’ve got to love a condemned murderer who can continue to cut up from the electric chair. “How about this for a headline in tomorrow’s paper,” James French said. “French Fries!”

Some last words will forever remain an enigma, their meaning gone to the grave along with their speakers. Henry David Thoreau’s “Moose, Indian,” for instance, and the eerie last words of John Wilkes Booth as he emerged from a burning barn, fatally wounded, looked at his hands and muttered, “Useless, useless.” In a similar vein, what to make of conductor Leonard Bernstein’s last words—”What’s this?”—or novelist Victor Hugo’s “I see black light”?

 

To me, the most genuine last words are those that arise naturally from the moment, such as Voltaire’s response to a request that he forswear Satan: “This is no time to make new enemies.” Compare that to the stagy, obviously rehearsed “Now comes the mystery” (Henry Ward Beecher) or Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Friends, applaud. The comedy is over.”

 

It may well be that planning your last words is no more profitable a pursuit than preparing your Nobel Prize acceptance speech. Who can say when the Grim Reaper will tap a bony finger on your shoulder? It is unlikely that poet Dylan Thomas thought “I’ve had 18 straight whiskeys. I think that’s the record” was going to be his swan song.

 

Could it be that “great last words” are a myth of the hale and hearty, and that the expiring understand that the deathbed is no place for 11th-hour philosophizing? Didn’t Christ himself sign off with the unpretentious “It is finished”? Besides, why should the mundane act of dying bring one any closer to the truth? Karl Marx may have had it right, for once, when he answered his housekeeper’s request for last words with: “Go on, get out! Last words are for fools who haven’t said enough!”

 

-          By Christopher Orlet, The Vocabula Review,  July/August 2002 Issue

being open minded

October 26th, 2012

“By all means let’s be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.” – Richard Dawkins, in “Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder”

Richard Dawkins may be the most articulate nutjob of our generation <by the way … simply being a nutjob doesn’t mean you cannot be brilliantly smart>.

Anyway.

This is an awesome thoughtful non-nutjob quote.

I believe the entire discussion of close minded versus open minded is a great one.

Look.

I believe we all know that being close minded is not a good thing but the whole idea of being open minded as being a bad thing is a really enlightening thought.

Open or closed … once again, as with most things in life, it is about balance. To me it is about leaving enough open in your mind to absorb additional information and leaving enough opening to let out <throw out the useless garbage> the ‘unnecessary’ or maybe better said ‘the information that has now become obsolete’ as you gain new knowledge.

All at the same time keeping your mind closed enough that all that knowledge <your brains as Richard so aptly calls it> don’t fall out.

In other words … don’t lose your perspective just because you received some new, hopefully good, information and knowledge.

This whole topic brought to mind another relevant quote:

“We are not retreating – we are advancing in another Direction.” - General Douglas MacArthur

We all gather information.

Okay. Only <regretfully> some people do.

And we also tend to redirect, or advance in another direction, given what we have learned. Or maybe you don’t even have to redirect because you can stay on the same path but maybe slow down a little or speed up a little.

But not everyone does, or can, do this.

I tend to believe no one actually wants to be close minded … they possibly just find it more comfortable. I also tend to believe not everyone knows HOW to be open minded.

Well. Maybe not effectively open minded.

You can try and listen. And try and be open minded. But it all really comes down to WHAT you do with having been open minded.

I say that because maybe, me being an asshole <on occasion>, tend to want to say “so frickin’ what?” when someone says “I will be open minded.”

Who cares? Because people who actually have to say those words tend to be the least open minded people. Sorry folks … while that is a generalization I will take that bet every time <and become a rich man>.  Yup. Trust me on this … the kiss of death in a business discussion is .. “okay, I will be open minded.” <translation: ‘you talk, I will pretend to listen, nod on occasion, and then we will do what I said we would do.”>

What really matters is the eventual action not the self proclamation.

In other words … what do you actually DO with the information you gained by being ‘open minded.’

-          Did your brains spill out and you vapidly followed the new information ? <which shows a lack of fortitude with regard to the initial preferred point of view/opinion/direction>

-          Did you simply nod and move on as if you didn’t hear a frickin’ think? <which shows  lack of integrity/sincerity by claiming to be open minded and yet you didn’t>

Being open minded is a skill. A skill to absorb … and the skill to not always open so far your brains spill out.

the silence lie

January 18th, 2012

“just because you didn’t speak the facts out loud didn’t erase their existence. silence was just a quieter way to lie.” – unknown

I am fairly sure I found these words in some tween blog.  I don’t remember the frame of reference but I wrote down the words because … well … I don’t really give a shit about the frame of reference because it defines the ‘silent lie’ better than anything else I have ever seen.

“silence was just a quieter way to lie.”

Boy oh boy.

That is a powerful thought.

I guess the funny thing is truth is truth … whether it is spoken or silent.  So why wouldn’t a lie be exactly the same?

A lie’s existence is not defined by words or lack of words … it is defined by whether it exists or not.

Maybe I say this because anything that exists can take on a life of its own.

It breathes and lives and, well, it actually eats.  It eats away at your thoughts and, if you are unfortunate, it eats away at your soul.

And if a lie exists then it does all that.

Frankly, I am not sure you can ever kill a lie. Even by eventually speaking the truth. I believe even in that case it doesn’t cease to exist but maybe by speaking it … it attains a more tangible form.  And maybe that makes it easier to accept … ok, well … maybe not accept.  Maybe it’s just live with it.

So if I believe that, when does a lie stop existing? When does it take its last breath?

Well.

I actually believe they take their last breath the same time you do. Yup. I believe lies are things you carry with you until the end of your days. You cannot erase their existence by ‘speaking the facts out loud.’ They are one of Life’s burdens.

I imagine we all lie at some point or another.

A white lie.  A lie of omission. A lie of silence. A lie of words. I personally don’t believe Life weighs lies … like there are ‘big lies’ and ‘little lies’ … I just believe Life counts them all simply as lies.

So.

Maybe the measure of our life is … how many lies take their last breath when we do at the end.

Enlightened Conflict