Enlightened Conflict

raincoats

December 29th, 2016

 autumn-rain-fall

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“Because of the way this garment <Mackintosh raincoat> is made.

There is no stitching involved, it’s completely bonded/glued, in order to keep the garment completely waterproof. I owned a vintage Mac that I wore for years in my early twenties until someone stole it at a party.

Even after literally doing everything to wear it out, that coat always looked immaculate.”

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Ok.

 

Today is the 250th birthday of the guy who invented the Mackintosh raincoat <a Glasgow Scot named Charles Macintosh>.

 

 

 

raincoat-charles-macintosh-google-doodle

 

I used to own a Mac. It was hot when wearing … but that sonuvabitch kept you dry as a bone.

 

Alas.

 

I believe it was a victim of one of the dozens of moves I have made as part of some garage sale or some Goodwill donation as I was purging things <that I only ended up rebuying again at some point>.

 

Charles Macintosh was a Scottish chemist and inventor of waterproof fabric.

 

Why am I writing about raincoats today <other than the fact I rue ditching my fabulous Mac>?

 

It is a reminder that inventions don’t have to be glamorous and that inventing is rarely glamorous.

 

It is a reminder that even with all the apps being ‘invented’ almost 95% of them are wasted energy and wasted money.

 

It is a reminder that most of the inventions that truly matter to us are the fruits of labor and not complete ingenuity but rather a practical ‘what the hell can I do with this’ attitude.

 

For example.

 

Macintosh had a nothing-wasted mind-set.

 

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His discovery of the long-sought solvent for rubber came out of his search for uses of some of the nastiest by-products of the nineteenth century progress,” Barnett writes. “Gas lamps were becoming popular in the cities of Europe, lighting up the wealthier streets and private homes. But the tar sludge left behind in the manufacture of coal gas was a public menace … Macintosh saw practical uses in the sludge and wastewater, which include valuable ammonia.

In 1819, Glasgow Gas Works was only too happy to sign a contract to sell him all the waste it produced.”

 

According to Today in Science, the sludge led to Macintosh’s famed invention:

In June 1823, Macintosh patented his process using a solution of india-rubber in naphtha soaked between two layers of cloth forming a sandwich that was pressed together. The rubber interior provided a layer impermeable to water, though still flexible.

His patent, No. 4,804, described how to “manufacture for rendering the texture of hemp, flax, wool, cotton, silk, and also leather, paper and other substances impervious to water and air.”

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From the nasty by products of civilization, which were thrown out as useless by the majority, one guy developed the rainproof fabric.

 

lamp bulb tulips isolated on white with clipping path

My point is that great ideas rarely arise from nothing … they arise from something. And they arise from someone who sees something in what others deem as useless or unimportant or some version of waste of time.

 

My point is that even disruption is defined by “discovering an unconventional way to do conventional things.’

 

My point is that the most meaningful inventions, the ones which impact the way we live, are not glitzy or glamorous or ‘seeking to be a global brand’ but rather pragmatic, practical and part of a way of living Life.

 

My point is that the best raincoat in the world was made from human excrement and industrial waste.

 

My point is that everything is useful.

 

young people smarter egg context

My point is that it is fairly likely that the next great idea is not going to be found by some branding guru or within some big high falutin’ brand but from someone we don’t know working in some garage using all the shit, some ideas and probably some random by-products … that all the ‘smart people’ have thrown away.

 

ideas versus obsessions

January 13th, 2015

idea ease love passion

=

“I have no ideas, only obsessions.

Anybody can have ideas.

Ideas have never caused anybody’s downfall.”

Emil Cioran

==

 

I just saw this quote.

 

 

I loved it.

 

 

What a frickin’ awesome thought.

 

 

Especially in today’s world where we talk ad nausea about how anyone can have a ‘good idea.’

 

 

 

 

Truth?

 

Not all ideas are created equal.

 

obsessed interested
Truth?

 

 

 

Not all people can come up with good ideas.

 

 

 

The quote suggests an injection of energy and passion and ‘belief’ into an idea … to make it something other than just an … well … idea.

 

 

Why is this important?

 

 

Because so often we sit in meetings and brainstorm and flippantly toss out ideas. And they are … well … just ideas.

 

Hollow? Maybe not completely.

 

Flat? Possibly.

 

 

Deep? Rarely … mostly created from some individualistic opinion or belief.

 

 

 

Obsession? Extremely rare.

 

 

And that is what differentiates ideas. The depth. There is an obsessive aspect to a great meaningful idea.

 

 

Sure.

 

People can obsess over an idea … and that idea can be crappy.

 

 

But if an idea generates obsession among people ?? … yikes. That is a frickin’ good idea.

 

What a great thought … “Ideas have never caused anybody’s downfall.”

 

 

An idea empty of some obsession qualities ain’t gonna rock the world.

 

 

And I imagine that is my point.

 

 

 

There are ideas.

 

 

And then there are ideas that change us <which means we have an opportunity to change the world>.

 

 

Uhm.

 

Unfortunately … these types of ideas come with a responsibility … a burden as a matter of fact. And not all people are capable of accepting this burden and not all people WANT to assume the responsibility of these types of ideas.

 

<a 2012 post about the burden of good ideas:

http://brucemctague.com/the-burden-of-good-ideas   >

 

 

 

To finish up … I will end where I began. obsession mercilessly bend

 

 

There are ideas you don’t love with ease … you love with passion.

 

 

Some of us desire these types of ideas.

 

And we obsess over them.

Enlightened Conflict